Bonus Track

Well. It’s your lucky day.  Because today I like my kids at my placement AND I don’t have anything due immediately (before noon tomorrow) so I thought today would be a good day to write about my kids.

Basically, as mentioned before, I work with kids in grades K-6 on social skills.  Which in itself it interesting enough.  Because I find myself practicing skills like not yelling, taking turns, and making eye contact when I’m listening.

And almost every day I have a conversation with my supervisor in which we speculate as to whether my children have social deficits because they have a hard time learning them, because they were never taught the rules, or because they just choose not to follow them.  We never know.  But regardless.  They have the deficits.  So we work on them.

And basically it’s my job to 1. explicitly state the social rules. 2. give them opportunities to practice them.

So that’s the ‘work’ part of my placement.  I teach 2 speech groups in the classroom and pull kids out for individual sessions.  But when I’m not doing that I just hang out with the k-2 grade kids and talk to them.  Because really, that’s the best way to practice social skills.

And from these talkative adventures, some stories have resulted.

From my k-2 graders:

We had a professional drummer visit our music class today.  He started by introducing himself and saying, “I have the best job in the world!” To which one of my children responded, “That is an opinion.” But after he played a set for us the same child said, “You are really good!  But that’s my opinion.”

I have another kid who likes facts. (In addition to the child mentioned above.)  So. Yesterday when he was being crazy during indoor recess I said, “Hey.  Do you want to talk about sharks?”  It worked.

I had another kid who didn’t want to be in class.  I told him I needed him to go back to class because I needed to go to another class.  He said, “Okay.  If you give me $20.”  I said, “I don’t have $20.”  He was shocked. “$1?”  “Nope.  I don’t even have a dollar.”  “You don’t have any money?!?”  “No.  I’m a student.  I don’t have a job.”  To which he responded, “You’re a student? But how are you so good?!?”

I work with one girl. She’s the very unique, spunky kind I think.  And she licks her fingers a lot.  But.  She has long blond hair and wears cute stripped dresses and plays with sticker books and walks with me to the park and tells me stories about Twinkle the Star.  And.  She hugs me and says, “I love you.”

She also got in an argument today with a peer about the Freedom Tower during our conversation about skyscrapers.  All I heard was, “SKYSCRAPER!” “NO. Freedom TOWER!” “no. SKYSCRAPER.”  I quickly explained that it’s both.

Also. I have a child that asks me EVERY TIME I read something or show a video clip in class if there is any sickness or dying in the content.  To which I always respond, “No.” and think, “This is kindergarten.  What kind of person do you think I am?!?”

In contrast.  My 4-6 grade boys:

Change the content of all our reading material so that it ends in death.

And speak with beeps in place of swear words.  For example.  They may say, “What the beep are you doing?”  Well.  This isn’t allowed because we aren’t to pretend to cuss at school.  However.  It’s one of those sentences that is very funny to read without intonation and adds comedy to the whole situation.

Also in class, when my students said they were listening even though they weren’t I said, “Who can tell me what I said?” to which one boy responded with, “I think it was something about Ryan Gosling.” It’s almost like he knows about all the teacher memes out there. (Examples to follow.)

Teacher Bits and Bobs: Blogger Meetup and Easter Break!Thanks Ryan Gosling

Also of note.  I have been working on creating my ‘teacher personality.’  Which, so far, means speaking in a sterner voice and wearing more cardigans.

k. Here’s some perspective taking for the road.  (That’s an idiom.  We work on those too.)

Perspective

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